100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

The EHA was invited by the Hydrogen section of the Hungarian Energy Association, member of the EHA,  to meet potential stakeholders in Hungary to facilitate the development of the Hungarian Strategic Research Agenda for hydrogen and fuel cells that is currently being undertaken by the Central Hungarian Innovation Centre with the support of the Hydrogen section. Together with Hydrogen section’s president Antal Ferenc Kovács of EETEK, a renewable energy investment company in Budapes, the EHA visited MOL the Hungarian petrol and gas company and MVM, the Hungarian Power company.  MOL and Slovnaft currently operate more than 800 filling stations in 7 CEE countries. INA, a MOL Group strategic partner, operates a further 456 sites in 3 countries. MOL has offered to review the Strategic Research Agenda and to verify potential involvement of MOL in future hydrogen developments. The EHA together with Dr. Kovacs also met with Dr Károly Gerse, senior deputy CEO of MVM, the Hungarian power company. Dr. Gerse showed us the fuel cell bicycle HyGo that was developed with MVM support by the University of Budapest and that is being demosntrated in the hall of MVM’s head office in Budapest. Dr. Gerse explained that MVM would be interested to explore hydrogen storage solutions in the future to balance the grid. He also offered to contribute to the Hungarian Strategic Research Agenda that will be completed and will include with policy recommendations and an economic evaluation the beginning of 2010.