100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

The latest Trans European Network for Transport TEN T call, that closes on February 26, 2015 is seeing again a number preparations of several H2 corridor proposals. Just before the successful results of the first TENT Hydrogen Infrastructure (HIT project ) were presented last December, the HIT2 Corridors kicked off linking the HIT locations to hydrogen refuelling stations (HRS) along the Baltic Sea from Sweden to Finland. It will also add four new National Implementation Plans in Finland, Poland, Latvia and Belgium and includes studies on sustainable HRS operations and the role of regional and local authorities, two topics that are closely related. Thanks to the efforts of the so-called Government Support Group of relevant national ministries of Germany, UK, Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands that started under the HIT project, the FCH JU  is  aligning  its support for FC electric vehicles (FCEV) and HRS to the TEN T funding. The upcoming TEN T Days this June 25-26 in Riga will offer an opportunity for H2 infrastructure and FCEV manufacturers to showcase their potential to Europe’s transport infrastructure barons to solicit support for an acceleration of the integration market ready alternative fuels including hydrogen to connect Europe’s main corridors in a sustainable way.