100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

2015 saw an increase of almost 40% growth in the number of public hydrogen refeulling stations (HRS) in operation worldwide. A total of 54  new HRS has opened in 2015 according to the eighth annual assessment by H2stations.org, a website of Ludwig-Bölkow-Systemtechnik (LBST) and TÜV SÜD. As of January 2016, the total number of hydrogen refuelling stations in operation worldwide is 214, 121 of them public.. Thanks to the increasing number of H2Mobility initiatives, after Germany, UK, France, Switzerland, Austria now also Italy is planning to submit it H2Italy roadmap to the Italian government this May, this number will increase even more in 2016. The 6 stations that opened that are not public are used for the  refuelling of buses or reserved for fleet customers. All of the 7 new stations in North America provide for public access. 6 are located in California and one in Colorado. Japan is leading the list with 28 new public stations. 19 stations have been opened in Europe. According to  LBST,  95 HRS are currently operating in Europe, 50 in North America, one in South America, one in Australia, and 67 in Asia. The EHA is keeping track on the public availability of HRS in Europe and the sources of hydrogen of individual stations through its network of national associations.

Photo: one of the latest HRS in Europe, the Paris location during the COP21