100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

A 700 bar fast-fill hydrogen refuelling station opened this week in Holstebro, Denmark. Capable of refuelling a fuel cell vehicle in less than three minutes, this station is the first of its type in the area and is one of the first steps towards forming a countrywide network by 2015; networks of this type will be needed by then to meet the demands of fuel cell vehicle fleets scheduled for commercialisation at that time.

Developed by H2 Logic A/S and operated by Danish energy company Vestforsyning A/S the project was supported by funding from the Danish EUDP program. Built in accordance with standard SAE J 2601, the station features a standardised dispenser nozzle and meets other requirements for speed of refuelling; hence it will be universally suitable for use with fuel cell vehicles meeting this standard.

The ultimate aim of projects like this is to attract the initial rollouts of fuel cell vehicles through facilitating the necessary infrastructure. A B-Class Mercedes F-CELL was showcased alongside the station to demonstrate the refuelling technology.

Source: Fuel Cell Today