100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

At the G8 conference in Hokkaido next month Suzuki will be present with a new hydrogen fuel cell version of its SX4 crossover, the SX4-FCV. Fitted with a fuel cell supplied by GM, and a 70 MPa (10,000 psi) storage tank, the SX4-FCV has a maximum operating range of 250 kilometers and a top speed of 120 km/h (around 75 mph). Power output from the fuel cell is rated at 80 kW, while the motor delivers 68 kW. Road testing has been approved by Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and transport, and will commence soon. Japan will set itself the goal of reducing emissions by 60-80% compared with current levels by 2050, with a mid-term reduction target of 14% by 2020 based on 2005 levels. The announcement was made by Japanese Prime Minister Yasuo Fukada on 9 June as part of the government’s vision “towards building a low-carbon society in Japan”. Furthermore, the Japanese government is planning the massive introduction of existing advanced technologies, including a forty-fold increase in solar power capacities by 2030. There are also plans to introduce an emissions trading scheme similar to the one launched by the EU, but on a voluntary and experimental basis