100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

The EU PCI Days this year gathered the an eclectic number of organisations around the Marine Grid Declaration driven by the Renewable Grid Initiative (RGI) seeking sustainable power cabling across Europe and the seas. TSO’s committed to sensibly preparing and monitoring the impact of cabling and wind power on marine environments. EHA signed the declaration on March 20, 2019 (see RGI director Antonella Battagliani with EHA executive director Marieke Reijalt)  to ensure also inclusion of hydrogen network development in these environments. EHA questioned the support for synergy projects to ensure sustainabel connection betweeen eletricity gas and transprot networks in the session on building sustainable sound PCI projects. The same  day CEF Energy 2019 call came out 750 mln deadline  June 13, 2019

WindEurope presented an investment agenda for the EU energy transition ambition scenario’s in the coming years: 100 bln year annuaally while ENTSOE estimated costs for their total TSO efforts the same amount for the next ten years!  A recent study of Navigant in the Netherlands concludes that biomethane and other renewable gases like hydrogen  could be scaled up to reach 270bcm by 2050, under a high-case scenario more than double they found in their last study . The results are from an update of their Gas for Climate study,  The Navigant study indicates that  the transmission pipes actually don’t need upgrading just modification of the compressors  to keep the gas at a certain pressure to deal with hydrogen as a high-volume gas with lower energy density.

For the distribution network (DSO) , Navigant assumes it will be mainly biomethane going to the households, through hybrid heat pumps in houses that have a gas connection today. This assumes that all new houses would be connected either to district heating networks, or have full-electric heat pumps, with 60% electricity and about 40% gas to meet peak demand during the cold period of winter. And the volumes that are required for that are relatively modest, which means you could quite easily do it with green gas, the study finds.