100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

The price of Toyota’s first commercial hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle which will be 7 million yen, which converts to roughly $70,000, £40,000. AU$73,000, €50,000. That does, however, make the pricing competitive with the all-electric Tesla Model S. The Tesla retails for close to $70,000 in the US, £40,000 in the UK and AU$97,000 in Australia.

The car will be commercialised in Japan before April 2015 and in the US and Europe by the summer of 2015. Australian availability was not announced.

Japan is now considering subsidies and tax breaks so fuel-cell vehicles can be purchased by consumers for about 2 million yen ($20,000, £11,500, AU$21,000) — the same price as gas-electric hybrids — by 2025.

Toyota sees fuel-cell technology — not pure battery-electric cars like the Tesla — as the future.
Jim Lentz, CEO of Toyota’s North American region, recently told that battery-electric vehicles are viable only in “a select way, in short-range vehicles that take you that extra mile… But for long-range travel primary vehicles, we feel there are better alternatives, such as hybrids and plug-in hybrids, and tomorrow with fuel cells.”