100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

Hyundai’s first ix35 Fuel Cell vehicles arrived in the UK, being successful with the attempt to spread the world’s first series-production hydrogen fuel car.

Last but not least, it comes just days after the government announced an £11 million fund to support the building of hydrogen refuelling infrastructure.

Among the first customers is ITM Power, directly involved in the process of building hydrogen infrastructure in the UK, with the support of government funding. The Sheffield-based firm is planning to open three new hydrogen refuelling stations in London by the spring of next year. As Hyundai prepares for the UK launch of its hydrogen-fuelled SUV, the firm has also been working with a number of projects including London’s Hydrogen Network Expansion (LHNE), the Hydrogen For Innovative Vehicles (HyFIVE) and the UKH2 Mobility project. Other first customers for the new fuel cell model include Air Products, Johnson Matthey and Transport for London.

The fuel cell stack converts hydrogen into electricity to drive the model’s wheels and also achieves 350 miles per full tank of hydrogen, a top speed of 100mph and a 0-62mph time of 12.5 seconds.

UK consumers can apparently now order an ix35 Fuel Cell model today by contacting Hyundai UK directly. Hyundai is expected to start further deliveries in early 2015.