100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

A hydrogen truck, with six electric motors, one for each wheel, powered by a fuel cell, with a total output of 1500 kW and zero contaminant emissions. Nikola One, this is the name of the vehicle, will be presented to the public on the 1st of December in Salt Lake City, Utah, as announced by the site of its manufacturer, Nikola Motor. The American company was founded only two years ago with the goal of building ecological work- vehicles. In May, the company announced that it will  launch on the market a gas-electric hybriddriving trucks. But it has now announced that it has changed the project, and have replaced the hybrid drive with the electric one powered by hydrogen fuel cells. The truck can go for 1,900 km with a full tank. However, given the lack of hydrogen fueling stations in the United States, the company also wants to build a network of stations in the country. “Nikola plans to have a national network of more than 50 hydrogen stations to start supplying customers in 2020,” said the founder and CEO of the company, Trevor Milton. The hydrogen will be produced by the electrolysis of water, using electricity from photovoltaic systems, all without polluting emissions.

Nikola Motor also announced the release of a work- electric vehicle 4×4, a UTV (Utility Task Vehicle) named. Nikola Zero.