100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

H2 Logic A/S has recently supplied a hydrogen refuelling station 150 meters north of the polar circle, at the Arctic Driving Centre in Finland. The station is based on H2Station® technology and provides three minutes fast fill of hydrogen at 700 bar for fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) being tested by car manufacturers under extreme cold climate conditions. The station is rented by the leading Finish gas company Oy Woikoski Ab which also handles the supply of hydrogen.

The decision by the driving centre to install facilities for testing of FCEVs was in response to demand from automotive OEMs.

Despite an average temperature of −15°C and sometimes as low as −45°C, FCEVs should be able to refuel for long ranges in a few minutes, just as if they were using gasoline. Fast-fill of hydrogen to any FCEV at any refuelling station worldwide, irrespective of local climate, is possible thanks to various industrial and globally agreed hydrogen refuelling standards such as the SAE J2601 fuelling protocol and because of a globally agreed nozzle design.

The H2Station® from H2 Logic provides full compliance with all applicable international standards, including refuelling in accordance with the specifications in SAE J2601, thus offering three minutes fast fill.

During 2011 H2 Logic opened similar fast-fill stations based on the H2Station®technology in Denmark and Norway, with several more stations planned and under manufacture during 2012.

Source: FuelCellToday