100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

EHA member ITM Power has been awarded a grant of €0.35 million to work with a consortium of partners to demonstrate energy-efficient technologies and energy storage solutions for non-residential buildings in an EU-funded project, CommONEnergy. The project aims to address the need to redesign and refurbish existing non-residential buildings to become more energy efficient to reduce their energy demand as well as the incorporation of peak shaving technologies such as energy storage that will allow for an increased use of intermittent renewable energy sources.

ITM’s main role is to integrate hydrogen energy systems in multiple-use non-residential buildings and to demonstrate the potential of hydrogen storage as an effective means of integrating renewables in the built environment. The company will install an energy storage system in a shopping centre to match the supply and demand profiles required to integrate a renewable power system. There is also potential for an expansion of the installation to include a refuelling system. ITM Power CEO, Graham Cooley, commented: “Energy storage solutions for the built environment are a key market for electrolysers and fuel cells. This project brings together a very significant European consortium to overcome some of the logistical and legislative hurdles to unlocking this potentially massive market in Europe.” 

Source: ITM Power