100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

Knut Schwalenberg, Managing Director Industrial Chemicals at Nouryon said: “Green hydrogen is a sustainable alternative to fossil-based raw materials and makes new forms of green chemistry possible – relevant for many markets in which we operate. This project is an important step in scaling up the electrolysis technology and supports long-term growth in the market for sustainably produced hydrogen.”

Gerard van Pijkeren, Managing Director at Gasunie New Energy, added: “Gas infrastructure plays a connecting and facilitating role in the energy transition. Also for aviation because it is used as feedstock for the production of sustainable kerosene. With the first Dutch electrolyser of 1 megawatt, at Zuidwending, in the province of Groningen, we have started the use of sustainable produced hydrogen. The plans for a 20 megawatt electrolyser – as we are currently developing with Nouryon in Delfzijl – already being scaled up, confirms the fast growing need for hydrogen and for hydrogen transport and storage. We’re developing this infrastructure together with our partners. This enables hydrogen to be used on a larger scale in the production of sustainable kerosene.”

 

Earlier this year, Nouryon and Gasunie agreed to supply green hydrogen to BioMCN for the production of renewable methanol, a raw material for biofuels and the chemical industry