100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

Following the United Kingdom, Denmark, Germany and Belgium, Norway is the 5th European country to start selling the Toyota Mirai. Uno-X Hydrogen, a newly established joint-venture that plans to establish 20 hydrogen stations by 2020 in Norway, is the first Norwegian owner of the Toyota Mirai. Uno-X Hydrogen stations all rely on renewable energy to produce hydrogen. The first of the 20 planned stations will use the surplus solar energy produced from the solar panels on the roof of the neighbouring energy-positive office buildings.

The Norwegian government recently confirmed its support to a nationwide network of hydrogen refuelling stations, it has also set up programs with the aim to reach sales of 50000 hydrogen cars by 2025. The governmental program offers many incentives that will make fuel cell cars even more attractive: these cars are exempt from registration taxes and VAT. Additionally, cost of ownership is further reduced for Norwegian fuel cell car drivers thanks to free toll roads and ferries, free public parking and access to bus lanes.

Toyota started commercializing the Mirai in 2015 and to date has delivered cars in Japan, California, Germany, UK, Denmark and Belgium with the Netherlands strting this July and Sweden to follow later this year.

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Photo credit: autoblog.com