100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

Anheuser-Busch anounced on May 3 2018 an agreement  to buy 800 Nikola hydrogen-electric trucks in an effort to convert its entire long-haul dedicated fleet to renewable powered trucks by 2025. In 2016  Budweisert placed an order for 40 of Tesla’s electric semis. Coincidentally, Nikola Motors filed a lawsuit this week against Tesla, alleging it has ripped off its truck design and estimating a loss of US$2 billion as a result.

Nikola One, claims a range of 800 to 1,200 mi (1,287 to 1,931 km) and a total of 1,000 hp (745 kW) and 2,000 lb.ft (1,475 Nm) of torque, to cut Anheuser carbon emissions for logistics by more than 18 percent, meaning taking 13,000 passenger off the road each year. It also harbors ambitions to run its entire long-haul fleet on renewable energy by 2025, while also cutting carbon emissions over its whole operations by 25 percent.

“At Anheuser-Busch we’re continuously searching for ways to improve sustainability across our entire value chain and drive our industry forward,” said Michel Doukeris, CEO of Anheuser-Busch. “The transport industry is one that is ripe for innovative solutions and Nikola is leading the way with hydrogen-electric, zero-emission capabilities. We are very excited by the possibilities our partnership with them can offer.”