100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

On 9 September 2013 the Ex-Formula-1-Driver Jan Lammers has officially unveiled the Forze VI at the former Naval Air Base Valkenburg in The Netherlands. This new hydrogen powered racecar has been designed and developed by a team of about 70 students from the Delft University of Technology. Building on the experience gained over the previous 5 years, Forze has managed to break through the important technical barriers. The Forze VI is a full-size racecar weighing 880 kg and has a top speed of 220 km/h, making it one of the fastest hydrogen powered cars ever.

The car has two electric motors with a combined power output of 190 kW (260 bhp). It can hold 3 kg of hydrogen in two tanks, which means the car can run on full power for 30 minutes, after which the tanks can be refueled in 3 minutes. The students want to use this car to demonstrate the role hydrogen can play in the future of mobility and energy storage.

Jan Lammers said: “Forze has chosen the competitive racing industry as a platform to promote the development of hydrogen fuel cells, because competition is known to push boundaries. It is fantastic to see the progress made on the Forze vehicles over the past 4 years. The Forze VI is the first hydrogen powered vehicle that can seriously compete against conventional petrol powered racecars.”

Read the full press release here.