100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

November 21 marked the first day of the three day annual Stakeholder Meeting  hosted by the FCH JU. The conference was started with opening remarks by Bart Biebuyck, executive director of the FCH JU, who highlighted some of the achievements of the joint undertaking. Most notably the growth in number of projects supported by the FCH JU, now 3.5 times more than 2014. Results from the http://www.fchju.eu2015 call, demonstrated that 105 were energy related, 45 transport, and 32 were cross-cutting. Of this year’s projects, 185 have now been funded representing 638 million EURO, with similar leverage of 681 million EURO by private funding. Alongside a reminder that the 2016 Horizon 2020 call is still open.

The rest of the day was divided into three panels respectively themed: technology validation in stationary applications: CHP, back-up power; technology validation in transport applications: vehicles, infrastructure, APU, fuel cells; Cross-cutting: Pre-normative research, safety issues, education and training, socio-economic & benchmarking.

One of the key messages disseminated from several of the projects is the importance of properly functioning refuelling stations. Without this, the ability to convince automobile owners of the viability of hydrogen vehicles.