100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply
When: 11 September, 2017

The Summer School focuses on:
Introduction to Fuel Cell, Electrolyser, and Battery Technologies

The increase in energy production from renewable sources creates a demand for energy storage technologies. Storage and conversion can be accomplished electrochemically, in batteries or chemically through electrolysis and fuel cells. There-fore, these technologies are predestined to play a major role in the energy production infrastructure of the near future.

During the Summer School, the main focus will be on the technological aspects. Starting from the fundamental principles of electrochemistry and thermodynamics the entire spectrum of materials, design and balance of plant will be covered both from an engineering point of view as well as from a modelling perspective. The technological courses will be augmented by more general lectures on energy policies and socio-economics.

In addition to the lectures, the participants will be asked to join in student projects where the content of the lectures can be applied to a case study to be presented at the end of the week.

All the lectures will be presented by highly acclaimed experts within the research fields from various universities, research centres and industry.

The Summer School targets students and young professionals within the fields of fuel cells, electrolysis and batteries.

More at: http://www.jess-summerschool.eu/JESS-2017 

 

Photo Credit: Jess Summer School