100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

At the One Europe One Grid conference a joint declaration was signed between Climate Parlement, Desertec. MedGrid, Renewables Grid Initiatives and Friends of the SuperGrid to support the development  of “a pan-European transmission network facilitating the integration of large-scale renewable energy and the balancing and transportation of electricity, with the aim of improving the European market”. The role of energy storage is key as indicated by Joe Corbett, of Mainstream Renewable Power of Ireland chair of one of the work groups.

In a panel discussion at the conference Michael Weinhold, CTO of Siemens indicated that in parallel to the Supergrid discussions in reality in Germany many local power network initiatives have sprung up of energy consumers building their own local renewable networks.

Delivering the keynote address, Belgian Minister for the North Sea,  Johan Vande Lanotte said “Over the last 30 years Europe has built a highways network. Our priority now must be to do the same for our electricity grids. This is how we will deliver Supergrid. In Belgium we are building a “Super plug” to connect a series of offshore wind parks and link Belgium with its neighbours. That is the first step to Supergrid.”

The new planned windpower in UK,  10.000 MW,  would require  4000 MW of exta gas power plants in the UK to back up low wind conditions. The US aims at  is 54 GW by 2030  (interim goal of 10 GW, 2020)  according to Eddie o’ Connor president of Friends of the SuperGrid.