100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply
The transposition of the EU Renewable Energy Directive on December 5, 2010 and the adoption of the National Renewable Energy Action Plans provided a comprehensive and binding regulatory framework, according to a new EU Communication presented on January 31, 2011, that is proving catalytic in driving forward  renewable energy development to achieve the ambitious targets that the EU has set itself. The  recent high growth rates have resulted in renewable energy constituting 62% of 2009 energy generation investments.
The EU Commission’s Communication (COM2011/31) includes an overview of  the renewable energy industry in Europe, its prospects to 2020 and addresses the outstanding challenges for the development of the sector.  The Communication presents an overview of  the renewable energy industry in Europe, its prospects to 2020 and addresses the outstanding challenges for the development of the sector, including progress on 10% renewable energy in transport target for 2020. The use of electricity sources (renewable or otherwise) and hydrogen in road transport was still negligible in 2008: none of the 27 National Renewable Energy Action Plan included a reference to hydrogen.
The Commission  invites Member States to implement the National Renewable Energy Action Plans, streamline infrastructure planning regimes, make faster progress in developing the electricity grid to balance higher shares of renewable energy and to develop cooperation mechanisms and start integrating renewable energy into the European market.