100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

The Industry Grouping of the Joint Undertaking for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen, NEW IG, Fuel Cell Europe, the European Regions and Municpalities Partnership for  fuel cells and hydrogen, HyER (formerly HyRaMP), and the EHA have sent a joint letter to EU Member States representatives in the Competiveness Council to explain the role of hydrogen and fuel cells in the decarbonizing transport by 2050. On the occasion of the presentation of the EU Spanish presidency of an EU Electric Car Plan in Seville,  the organisations draw  Member States’ attention to fuel cell cars next to battery cars as part of electric transport.  Fuel cell transport applications such as cars, buses, taxis, forklifts, motorbikes and trucks are currently being developed, tested and demonstrated at EU, national and local level. What is needed additionally is in particular a coordinated approach towards increased project funding, regulatory support and development of technical standards both at EU and at Member State level. Such measures are crucial to provide a stable and predictable environment to attract the necessary private investment and make the shift to zero emission transport a reality. The organisations therefore call upon the Competitiveness Council and the European Commissionto acknowledge the need for increased and coordinated EU financial support to commercialize electrical mobility in the EU, including battery and fuel cell electric vehicles. The joint letter can be downloaded below.