100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

Air Liquide announces that it is investing in, installing and commissioning a new public hydrogen filling station in Rotterdam, Netherlands, for fuel cell electric vehicles, in collaboration with the Dutch Ministry of Transport and the Environment.

This project has the financial backing of the European Union as part of the Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T) program. These TEN-T community funds constitute an important source of European Union funding for transport infrastructures. This is the first time that European TEN-T funding has been allocated to the development of hydrogen electric mobility.

This station will be the first Air Liquide hydrogen filling station located in the Netherlands. With the capacity to provide fifty fills per day, this dual-pressure station, which will operate at 350 and 700 bar, will supply hydrogen for fuel cell electric vehicles. One fill will provide these vehicles with an autonomy of 500–600 km.

This station will open to the public in late 2013 as part of a European hydrogen infrastructure deployment project run by Air Liquide and six other European partners*. The project also includes studies on the opening of filling stations in four European countries: France, Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands.