100% renewable targets will require power storage to manage flows on the net
Electrolysers utilise these intermittent power flows to produce H2 gas from water
H2 gas can be stored in large quantities underground and transported via existing gas pipelines
H2 vehicles recharge faster and are more durable than battery powered transport
Growing H2 demand in industrial processes will reduce costs and increase supply

The study, which firmly identifies innovative fuel cell micro-CHP (FC mCHP) products as a promising new technology and plots a path towards their commercialisation in the coming years, comes as the EU prepares to publish its first ever Heating and Cooling Strategy by the end of 2015.

The present study outlines a pathway for commercialising stationary fuel cells in Europe. It produces a comprehensive account of the current and future market potential for fuel cell distributed energy generation in Europe, benchmarks stationary fuel cell technologies against competing conventional technologies in a variety of use cases and assesses potential business models for commercialisation. Considering the results of the technological and commercial analysis, the study pinpoints focus areas for further R&D to sustain innovation and provides recommendations for supportive policy frameworks.

The study has been sponsored by the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking. Compiled by Roland Berger Strategy Consultants, it builds on an interactive approach involving a coalition of more than 30 companies, public institutions and associations from the stakeholder community of the European stationary fuel cell industry.

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